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Coco-macadamia

You were all waiting for her, here she is! Today we announce our new flavor! For this new Naak bar, we combined two ingredients with very interesting nutritional properties and unique tastes: coconut and macadamia nuts!

Why these ingredients? What are the nutritional properties of this new bar? We will answer these questions in this article.

Coconut (1,2,3,4,5,6)


The coconut is the fruit of the coconut palm, which dominates the beaches and tropical islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

Naak chose this ingredient in its new recipe because, in addition to being tasty, coconut has excellent nutritional properties.

First, it is rich in fiber, 9 g per 100g, which is beneficial for the intestinal transit.

In addition, it contains 35% of lipids, and the majority of them are triglycerides, the main constituent of animal and vegetable fats.

It should be noted that the particularity of the triglycerides contained in the coconut is that they provide energy rather than being stored in fat. This is due to a lipid in particular: lauric acid, a medium-chain saturated fatty acid, which represent the majority of the lipids contained in the coconut. In addition, lauric acid has antibacterial and antiviral properties that strengthen the immune system.

There is a great deal of controversy about saturated fats in the diet as these would be said to be linked to an increased risk of heart disease. However, recent studies have shown that there is no significant evidence to conclude that dietary saturated fats are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. All nutrients are essential to the proper functioning of the body when consumed in moderation.


Coconut is therefore a very good source of energy, quickly used by our metabolism.

Macadamia (6,7,8,9,10)


 

Less well-known than coconut, the macadamia nut is the fruit of a walnut originating in Australia. It consists of an almond (the edible part), wrapped in a solid shell, itself covered with a fleshy envelope that quickly disappears when drying.

Let's now talk about the nutritional properties of macadamia nuts.

These are essentially made of lipids. In more detail, ¾ of the lipids fatty acids found in macadamia nuts are monounsaturated, the majority being omega 9. The latter are beneficial to our organism by providing it with energy.


In general, unsaturated fats have recognized beneficial effects on cardiovascular function and may contribute to better glycemic control in diabetics.

Like coconut, macadamia nuts possess a lot of dietary fiber: 9 g of fiber per 100 g of nuts, which is, as previously mentioned, very good for intestinal transit. It is also a good source of minerals such as calcium and magnesium and vitamins like vitamin B1.

The bar (6)


Let’s now focus on the whole bar. It has the same base of natural ingredients as the choco-banana and choco-orange: dates, crickets, maple syrup, sunflower butter, ground chia seeds, and apple juice, to which we added two ingredients mentioned above, the famous coconuts and macadamia nuts. The latter brings a crunching dimension that you will love.

You will notice there is no sea salt in this new product. It is therefore suitable for those who do not wish to have an electrolyte boost in their bars, thus offering a wider range of choices.

Moreover, the coco-macadamia bar contains 12 g of lipids. This is due to the presence of the coconut and the macadamia nuts. This latter is rich in monounsaturated lipids: omega 9 that are beneficial to our body at different levels (control of blood glucose and circulatory system), while the lipids from the coconut provides the body with energy readily to be utilized!

In addition, this bar has an optimal omega 6: omega 3 ratio of 2: 1. The western diet is often criticized for being too low in omega 3, thus the high content of the bar in this fatty acid is perfect to balance the balance.

Finally, the bar has 30 g of carbohydrate for 9 g of protein, a ratio close to 3: 1, ideal for athletes after physical exercise to allow optimal recovery.

 

 Click here to pre-order this new flavour !

 


REFERENCES


(1) Nayar, N. M. (2017). The coconut: Phylogeny, origins, and spread.


(2) Siri-Tarino, P. W., Sun, Q., Hu, F. B., & Krauss, R. M. (January 01, 2010). Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 91, 3, 535-46.


(3) In Hui, Y. H., In Evranuz, E. O., & Hui, Y. H. (2012). Handbook of plant-based fermented food and beverage technology. Boca Raton, Fla.: CRC Press.


(4) Dayrit, F. M. (January 01, 2015). The Properties of Lauric Acid and Their Significance in Coconut Oil. Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society, 92, 1, 1-15.


(5) Health Canada (2015) “Noix, noix de coco, crue” (code 2558), Fichier canadien sur les éléments nutritifs (FCÉN)


(6) Whitney, E., & Rolfes, S. R. (2015). Understanding nutrition. Stamford: Cengage Learning


(7) Alasalvar, C., & Shahidi, F. (2009). Tree nuts: Composition, phytochemicals, and health effects. Boca Raton: CRC Press.                                                                                                                            

(8) Kien, C. L., Bunn, J. Y., Tompkins, C. L., Dumas, J. A., Crain, K. I., Ebenstein, D. B., Koves, T. R., ... Muoio, D. M. (January 01, 2013). Substituting dietary monounsaturated fat for saturated fat is associated with increased daily physical activity and resting energy expenditure and with changes in mood. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 97, 4, 689-97.

(9) Les diététistes du Canada (2016) Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Retrieved from https://www.dietitians.ca/Downloads/Public/noap-position-paper.aspx               


(10) Health Canada (2015) Noix, macadamia (queensland), crues (code 2575), Fichier canadien sur les éléments nutritifs (FCÉN)
Nutrition

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